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Thoughts on Conserving African American Cemeteries

Across the country African American cemeteries have been abandoned, rediscovered, and identified as in need of preservation. Behind each of these individual stories is a complex hidden landscape created by enslavement, segregation, exclusion, and economic hardship. It is also a geography that reveals patterns of migration, forgotten settlements, demographic shifts as well as the strength and resilience of African American communities.

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Launching the Maritime Washington National Heritage Area

Watching the development of a national heritage area is a bit like observing the formation of a solar system. Partners large and small are attracted to the heritage area idea like planets around a sun and if the perceived benefits are powerful enough the gravitational force will bind them together around a unified vision. With the conservation movement’s interest in how to build effective large landscape networks examining how this actually happens on the ground might be productive. What lessons can we learn from the formation of the Washington Maritime National Heritage Area?

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View of a farm in rolling hill son the cover of the Alliance Review journall

Turning a Spotlight on the Living Landscape Observer

The need for a closer partnership between conservation and historic preservation was one of the motivations for the creation of the Living Landscape Observer (LLO). The LLO reports on large landscape conservation, an approach that blends ingredients of land conservation, historic preservation, and sustainable community development.

Read More »

The Perils of Marking where History Happened

In Pennsylvania over 2,500 state historical markers, some dating back over one hundred years, dot the roadside. A recent system wide review of the marker’s text brought controversy, but also a thoughtful analysis of the content of those markers that attempt to interpret Indigenous and African American histories. Timely thoughts as public history agencies struggle to do the right thing.

Read More »

Thoughts on Conserving African American Cemeteries

Across the country African American cemeteries have been abandoned, rediscovered, and identified as in need of preservation. Behind each of these individual stories is a complex hidden landscape created by enslavement, segregation, exclusion, and economic hardship. It is also a geography that reveals patterns of migration, forgotten settlements, demographic shifts as well as the strength and resilience of African American communities.

Read More »

Launching the Maritime Washington National Heritage Area

Watching the development of a national heritage area is a bit like observing the formation of a solar system. Partners large and small are attracted to the heritage area idea like planets around a sun and if the perceived benefits are powerful enough the gravitational force will bind them together around a unified vision. With the conservation movement’s interest in how to build effective large landscape networks examining how this actually happens on the ground might be productive. What lessons can we learn from the formation of the Washington Maritime National Heritage Area?

Read More »
View of a farm in rolling hill son the cover of the Alliance Review journall

Turning a Spotlight on the Living Landscape Observer

The need for a closer partnership between conservation and historic preservation was one of the motivations for the creation of the Living Landscape Observer (LLO). The LLO reports on large landscape conservation, an approach that blends ingredients of land conservation, historic preservation, and sustainable community development.

Read More »

The Perils of Marking where History Happened

In Pennsylvania over 2,500 state historical markers, some dating back over one hundred years, dot the roadside. A recent system wide review of the marker’s text brought controversy, but also a thoughtful analysis of the content of those markers that attempt to interpret Indigenous and African American histories. Timely thoughts as public history agencies struggle to do the right thing.

Read More »